The art of baseball

In celebration of Major League Baseball’s opening day, this issue of Profiles features illustrations of America’s national pastime. Take a short break and let these images bring back the nostalgia, the drama, and the simple joy of the game.

You’ll find ProFile Stock is loaded with premium illustrations like these by many the world’s most respected illustrators—including a few inductees to the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame. And, unlike typical stock venues, you won’t have to slog through pages of mind-numbing, look-alike, clip art to find something worthwhile.

If you’d rather drive rusty x-acto blades under your fingernails than use mediocre, overused stock, give the artists at ProFile Stock a try. It may be just what you’re looking for.

Try ProFile Stock this month and pocket a cool $40.00

Just license at least one image (min. $100) before April 30 and we’ll send you a check for $40.00. It’s that easy. No rebate forms. No coupon codes. Check it out.

Bart Forbes

Bart Forbes

Jackie Robinson by Bart Forbes

Jackie Robinson by Bart Forbes

Stan Musial by Bart Forbes

Stan Musial by Bart Forbes

Joe DiMaggio by Bart Forbes

Joe DiMaggio by Bart Forbes

Neal Aspinall

Neal Aspinall

Ken Dubrowski

Ken Dubrowski

Christy Mathewson by Dugald Stermer

Christy Mathewson by Dugald Stermer

Dugald Stermer

Dugald Stermer

Roberto Clemente by Dugald Stermer

Roberto Clemente by Dugald Stermer

Honus Wagner by Dugald Stermer

Honus Wagner by Dugald Stermer

C. F. Payne

C. F. Payne

Marc Phares

Marc Phares

Chris Lyons

Chris Lyons

Neal Aspinall


aspinall-1Neal Aspinall’s finely crafted illustrations evoke an aesthetic firmly rooted in the past and infused with a wonderful nostalgic flavor, however, he deftly uses the retro genre to effectively communicate ideas and concepts with a very contemporary flair.

Neal’s all-star client list is a testament to his versatility and the broad appeal of his work. If you’re not familiar with Neal Aspinall yet, read on. No matter what vintage you’re after, he may be the perfect solution for your next project.

How long have you been working as an illustrator?

23 years (1985)

What led you into illustration as a career?

My 3 older siblings were all into art and my dad was a draftsman, so there was always a lot of drawing supplies around. I never considered any other career.

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Who or what were your influences?

Too many to list, but here are a few— Duffy Design, vintage travel posters, Rockwell, Lyndecker, Nike design approach, Charles Anderson, WPA posters, American advertising of the 30’s, 40’s, and 50’s (pre 60’s) Chuck Boie, Neil Peart, poster stamps, fruit crates, cigar bands, vintage postcards, vintage luggage stickers, the Pink Panther cartoons, and many other inspirations.

What is the origin of your retro style?

Pre 60’s Americana.

Has your approach to image making evolved over the years?

Very much. Working at commercial art studios my first 9 years, I was asked to do many styles, and do them very fast. This was great experience and learned a lot observing some the old masters of the business firsthand.

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What’s the key to a successful collaboration between an art director and illustrator?

Remembering that you as the illustrator don’t know everything, and remembering who in the end is paying the bill. That doesn’t mean I don’t make many suggestions and go above and way beyond what is expected from the AD.

What’s the best part of your job?

Doing what I was born to do and not being on a time clock. I also get to be much more involved in my kids’ lives than most dads.

What’s the worst part of your job?

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Providing my own health insurance and taking it in the shorts when there’s an economic crater.

Do you ever feel restricted or limited by the style you’ve defined for yourself?

I don’t feel restricted by having one style, and feel that is the only way to make it to the big time. Art buyers have a lot on their mind it’s important to develop a ‘brand’ that is you.

 

Many of your pieces are as much about design and typography as they are about illustration. Do you consider yourself an illustrator, a designer, or?

I consider myself both a designer (started out in the business as a designer) and illustrator (designustrator). My school in Colorado forced all students to learn both disciplines and this has served me well. I love the whole process—the concepting, the pencils, the typography, and final art.

thumb-7What do you enjoy doing when you’re not working?

I enjoy water skiing, x-country skiing, downhill skiing, mountain biking, ping pong, walking my dog, camping, Bible study, playing with my kids, snorkeling, swimming in lakes, loons, shelling, Frisbee®, boat rides, campfires, & watching the NFL.

 

Search Neal Aspinall’s stock archives at aspinall.profilestock.com

Visit Neal Aspinall’s web site at www.nealaspinall.com

All images copyright © 2008 Neal Aspinall. All rights reserved.